“Out of Chaos;” Isaiah 45:18-24; Romans 14:1-12; September 14, 2014; FPC Holt

“Out of Chaos”
Isaiah 45:18-24; Romans 14:1-12
September 14, 2014, First Presbyterian Church of Holt

Audio Available Here: http://www.fpc-holt.org/images/stories/downloads/9-14-14.mp3

As I preach today, I’d invite you to consider two questions:

W2014 9 14 Slide02here in your life do you experience the greatest sense of spiritual fullness? Where do you experience the most emptiness? We’ll reflect on this a bit later, but for now I’d like you to hold on to those two questions as we dig into our texts together.

2014 9 14 Slide03Chaos. It’s a word that’s used quite a lot. Maybe you’ve used it in reference to your own life: in the business of work, the start up of a new school year, or in the midst of a time of upheaval or transition.

I’m sure I’ve used the term a time or two in the last few months as I’ve transitioned from my last ministerial position, planned a wedding, and moved to a new state. The way we usually refer to the word “chaos” we mean overly busy or disordered. While this is certainly a valid definition for this word, it takes a different meaning when we look at it in Hebrew.

2014 9 14 Slide04In our passage in Isaiah, what we read as “chaos,” is the Hebrew word “toehoo.” “Toehoo” carries meanings of formlessness, confusion, unreality, emptiness. It also can be a figurative negative attribute as in being morally empty or purposeless.

It is the tenth word in the Hebrew Bible, setting the scene for the start of all creation. In Genesis beginning at verse 1, we read:

2014 9 14 Slide05“In the beginning when God created the heavens and the earth, the earth was toehoo and darkness covered the face of the deep, while a wind from God swept over the face of the waters.” This place of chaos provides the raw ingredients from which the entire creation came into existence.

2014 9 14 Slide06We read in our text from Isaiah (45:18) today, “the LORD, who created the heavens did not create it a chaos, [but] formed it to be inhabited!”

Our world and our lives have not been created for emptiness, but for formation and transformation in the fullness of God. Through God’s creative acts, the toehoo of Genesis is transformed into the fullness of creation: water and land, fish and birds, people and plants. In the same way, God desires to fill our lives with joy and peace, hope and love, grace and redemption.

2014 9 14 Slide07I came across an interesting historical study of this word, “toehoo” in an article by Professor of Theology, Catherine Keller called, “The Lost Chaos of Creation.” In this article she details out the history of translators’ exclusion of this word in the Genesis narrative for hundreds of years, with it virtually disappearing from theology by the fourth century, because it was thought to negate the theological understanding that God created all things from nothing. Those translators wanted to run from the chaos present at creation, from the mess that is so integral to our beginning. As the verse was added back into translations as late as the early 20th century it was confrontational to the theological scholars of that time.[1]

SLIDE 8 - DistortedIt is hard to hold in our heads the knowledge that we can both be created in God’s image and created out of chaos. It does not seem that God would choose to make this entire creation that God calls “good” out of what was chaotic, but yet, God takes all that is chaotic and unformed and transforms it into a beautifully ordered universe.

Similarly it can be hard to hold in our hearts the knowledge that we are both imperfect sinners and redeemed children of God.

As part of the Presbyterian pastor call process we’re required to write a statement of faith. And your Associate Pastor Nominating Committee was in turn required to read many a statement of faith. In mine I wrote:

2014 9 14 Slide09“Our Creator desires that we live into God’s intentions for our lives. God has joyfully set out plans for all of creation, and specifically for our lives, yet waits with a deep patience for us to respond, for us to be formed into who God has created us to be.”

If our beginning place as God’s creation is chaos, that is emptiness and lack of purpose, our fulfillment means being full of life and energized with purpose.

And so let’s revisit my questions from before.

2014 9 14 Slide10 First, where do you experience the most emptiness? What in life causes you to experience this toehoo, chaotic void? Are there relationships or activities that make you feel withdrawn from God’s fullness? Are there places in your life you need to seek healing or forgiveness so that you can better feel the grace, mercy, and love of Jesus Christ? Are there aspects of your routine that have become so routine that you struggle to experience God’s presence in the midst of them? How might you invite God into that experience, those perhaps unacknowledged relationships?

2014 9 14 Slide11And for our other question: where do you experience the greatest sense of spiritual fullness? Where do you feel the most fulfilled in God’s purposes? What relationships vest enable you to acknowledge God’s presence? How can you nourish and sustain these experiences of God’s fullness? How can you fill your time, your head, and your heart with the goodness God has shown you? How can you expand into the joy that God has in store for you?

While we seek to grow in our faith we can take comfort knowing that while our God created the world, God does not leave us simply to fend for ourselves. 2014 9 14 Slide12In fact, God sent God’s only son, Jesus Christ to come and live in this world among us. Jesus demonstrated how to live a full and purpose-filled life through his ministry and mission on earth, one which we are called to imitate.

Our passage in Romans reminds us of our eternal place in Christ’s care. 2014 9 14 Slide13We read in verses 8 and 9, “If we live, we live to the Lord, and if we die, we die to the Lord; so then, whether we live or whether we die, we are the Lord’s. For to this end Christ died and lived again.” Christ died so that we may be saved from the chaos of sin and lived again so we might know God’s abundant power.

2014 9 14 Slide14God made us out of chaos, but does not leave us there. May our lives be filled with purpose in the knowledge and experience of God’s great love. Thanks be to God! Amen.

[1] Catherine Keller “The Lost Chaos of Creation,” The Living Pulpit (April – June 2000): 4-5.

Advent August: Week Two Update

Last week I posted about this month of intentional Advent in my life, utilizing the four-fold pattern of Advent signifying hope, preparation, joy, and love. Here are some updates on goals I established in my last post:

Hope

  • Working on a book proposal for the Young Clergy Women imprint of Chalice Press: While in seminary I did a directed study on multi-sensory worship utilizing Howard Gardner’s theories on multiple intelligences in a worship context. I have started some preliminary research on what other books are out there so as not to write something that’s already available. At the moment I think I’m planning to work from the angle of a workbook that would provide options for multi-sensory experiences for church depending on the church’s size and resources available. Many churches get stuck on multi-media/multi-sensory worship having to look one particular way, and if they do not have technology available they might think it is outside of their reach. I want to create resources with these different settings in mind to show that’s possible in each context. I’m excited how this work will go hand in hand with the “Upstream” contemporary/participatory service at FPC Holt.

Preparation

  • Packing is going relatively well. I am grateful for my husband’s support as we sort through things. I’m also in a pretty good place with having enough boxes with offers for more boxes from friends who have recently moved.

Joy

  • Spending with friends in the area:
    • Visited with my dear friend/FPC Jesup secretary and her son. I got to join them in releasing a butterfly that had recently hatched from a cocoon! It was so cool and I was reminded that I definitely want to raise butterflies whenever we have kids.
    • Bailey and I visited with a sweet fellow pastor friend and her kids, enjoying reading kids books, singing “Jesus Loves Me,” and sharing pictures from the wedding. It was such a nice day!
  • On the cross-stitch front I finished creating a pattern, off of others I had seen, on an Excel spreadsheet and just began stitching it.

image

Love

  • Today I finished editing up a very abbreviated video of our wedding ceremony, which makes it possible to show the wedding to friends and family who were not able to be at the service:

Thank you for your prayers and support! May this season be a blessed one for you as well!

Advent August: What’s Next? What’s Now?

I finished my last day as Pastor of First Presbyterian Church of Jesup, IA and will beginning my new position as Associate Pastor of First Presbyterian Church of Holt, MI in just a few weeks. With the blessing of this time in between the two positions I am using these next few weeks as an intentional time of Advent. While we’re used to Advent in terms of the expectation of Christ’s birth, it can be a more general term for the anticipation of something to come. In the season of Advent we use four candles on the Advent wreath signifying hope, preparation, joy, and love. I’ll be using this same formula to share some of my goals, and then to touch back on them throughout the coming weeks, though most likely not in this particular order.

Hope

Preparation

  • Spending lots of time sorting, cleaning, and packing as we prepare for our move.
  • Spending time unpacking once in Michigan.

Joy

  • Enjoying sabbath rest
  • Spending with friends in the area
  • Praying while knitting
  • Reteaching myself how to cross-stitch

Love

  • David and I married on August 2nd and we’ll be going on our honeymoon to the Grand Canyon!
  • Here’s a video from the wedding reception a sweet family friend made for us:

I appreciate your prayers and support in this Advent season so that I may be strengthened in faith and ministry for many years to come!

Letter for October Newsletter

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ,

Happy Autumn! For me the beginning of October always brings the sound of crisp leaves crunching under my feet,  tastes of apple cider and pumpkin flavored everything, and scenes of red-orange-yellow trees where ever I look. Perhaps for you it brings up memories of family hayrides or corn mazes. Maybe you have traditions of apple-picking or pumpkin carving. As we see the leaves changing outside we are also aware of the many changes happening in our lives. For me this has been a major time of transition: moving to Jesup, starting work here at First Presbyterian, and getting settled into the community. What an amazing few weeks this has been. I am overwhelmed by the hospitality that this community has shown me as I begin here. A great big thank you for:

  • Everyone who worked so tirelessly on preparing the manse for my arrival. The house looks great. When I arrived I walked around the house in awe of all the work that had been done. It’s really starting to feel like home!
  • Everyone who helped to unload the moving truck. The crew unloaded a 20 foot moving truck (including an upright piano) in just 30 minutes!
  • The lovely housewarming shower. I appreciate all the gifts you have given me to help me get started here in Jesup. Thank you for your kindness and generosity.
  • A very special thank you to Kathy & Rich Bucknell, Dean Zuck, Gary & Gladys Rowley, Paul Nagle, Bruce Miller, Barbara Meister, Judy Fratzke, Bob McInerny, Dyrk Dahl, Mike & Donna Schares, Rob & Rachel Thomas family, Rick Zuck, Justin Zuck, Trent Zuck and Eric Zuck. Each of these people went above and beyond with their help in working on the manse and helping with the move (my apologies if I left anyone out!).

For each of you there are likely other transitions in your life: adjusting to the rhythms of the new school year, adjusting to an empty nest with kids gone to college or to new jobs, adjusting to being newly retired, or adjusting to a new family dynamic in the wake of a new marriage, a new life, or a new death. As the old axiom says, “the only thing constant is change.” Or, to tap into our Presbyterian roots, we are to be “reformed and always being reformed according to the Word of God.” As people of the “reformed” faith, we are particularly charged not to avoid change but to embrace it in all the possibilities that it brings. We know that as the leaves fall to the ground, they give way for new life to begin again. In an ever changing world, we have hope in the new life change brings. May it be so in all of our lives.

Blessings,

Pastor Kathleen Sheets