“Live for Righteousness,” 1 Peter 2:19–25, May 7, 2017, FPC Holt

“Live for Righteousness”
1 Peter 2:19–25
May 7, 2017, First Presbyterian Church of Holt

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Have you ever been reading the Bible and you’ve thought, “I’d really like to cut that part out?” Or, “following God would make so much more sense if we just skipped over this verse.” If so, this passage which says God approves of enduring suffering unjustly, would certainly be on the chopping block.

In the case of Thomas Jefferson, this was quite literally what he did.  The Smithsonian reports, “Jefferson was devoted to the teachings of Jesus Christ. But he didn’t always agree with how they were interpreted by biblical sources, including the writers of the four Gospels, whom he considered to be untrustworthy correspondents.

So Jefferson created his own gospel by taking a sharp instrument… to existing copies of the New Testament and pasting up his own account of Christ’s philosophy, distinguishing it from what he called ‘the corruption of schismatizing followers.’” Being a very pragmatic man he cut out anything that seemed “contrary to reason,” including miracles and even Christ’s resurrection.

“Jefferson produced the 84-page volume in 1820—six years before he died at age 83—bound it in red leather and titled it The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth.’”

And then theologians throughout time immemorial rolled over in their graves. Or so we can imagine.

Interpreting scripture can be a very dangerous thing if we, like Jefferson, take away every bit that makes us uncomfortable to we manipulate the text to cater to our own biases and presuppositions.

This passage in particular is a dangerous one as has been used time and again to silence victims and to embolden abusers. There are some who have twisted these verses to mean that domestic abuse is something they simply have to endure, a byproduct of living the Christian life. I want to say upfront that that is not what this text is about.

Seminary professor, David deSilva writes, “I must especially stress that domestic violence and abusive marriages are not ‘sanctioned’ in some way by this text.. [it] has led to such problematic applications, with the result that some pastors or other Christian friends will advise a spouse to remain in an abusive relationship because this is God’s will. Physical abuse between spouses, however, was not sanctioned even by Greco-Roman statutes, and so persevering in an abusive relationship cannot have been an aspect of the witness to the unbelieving spouse…

the author is speaking very specifically about suffering endured for ‘doing what is right’, for ‘doing good,’ ‘for the name of Christ,’ and for ‘bearing the name’ of ‘a Christian.’ Suffering ‘in line with God’s will’ is quite explicitly limited by this author to suffering encountered because of obedience to Jesus’ call.”

In 1 Peter there are two different Greek words for used for suffering. One of them is path’-ay-mah. This word speaks of the things that happen to us, a trial we have endured. In our particular passage today the word for suffering is paschko. Paschko is slightly different. It refers to our experience, “a sensation or impression.”

The suffering of pain is apart of the human condition, but our vulnerability to fully experiencing suffering is more deliberate. Path’-ay-mah is inevitable, paschko is not.

Paschko, the suffering highlighted in our scripture today, is the type of suffering that stays with us, that makes us able to give and receive compassion. It is the beginning of empathy.

Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, best known for the five stages of grief she describes in her book, On Death and Dying, writes, “The most beautiful people we have known are those who have known defeat, known suffering, known struggle, known loss, and have found their way out of the depths. These persons have an appreciation, a sensitivity, and an understanding of life that fills them with compassion, gentleness, and a deep loving concern. Beautiful people do not just happen.”

This call to enter into the suffering of Christ, is a call to become beautiful through vulnerability. Every one of us is shaped by the pain and suffering in our lives. We can choose to shoulder the burden, stuff the hurt inside and never let it see the light, allowing it to embitter us. Or, we can invite the peace that Christ embodied, even and especially, as he surrendered his earthly life on the cross.

Parker Palmer wrote about this in his book, A Hidden Wholeness. He says that there are two kinds of broken hearts: the first is one that is “an unresolved wound we carry with us for a long time, sometimes tucking it away and feeding it, sometimes trying to “resolve it” by inflicting the same wound on others.” The second is a different way to consider what a broken heart might mean. He says, “Imagine that small clenched fist of a heart ‘broken open’ into the largeness of life, into greater capacity to hold one’s own and the world’s pain and joy.” He then shares a Hasidic tale where a disciple asks the rabbi, “”why does Torah tell us to place these words upon our hearts? Why does it not tell us to place these holy words in our hearts?” The rabbi answers, “It is because as we are, our hearts are closed, and we cannot place the holy words in our hearts. So we place them on top of our hearts. And there they stay until, one day, the heart breaks, and the words fall in.”

It is not a comfortable thing to know that Christ died for us, that Christ’s pain brought about our freedom. Right after speaking of Christ’s suffering we are told by the author to follow in Christ’s example. This is not a call to sadistic self-depreciation, but an invitation to embrace the reality that Christ died for us, Christ rose for us. Christ reigns in power over us and Christ prays for us. That there is nothing we can do to earn God’s grace, but everything we can do to respond to this great sacrifice.

This is the call to discipleship: knowing to our core that God cares so deeply for us, to allow that love to fall into our broken hearts, and then to live as the loved and liberated children of God we are. Amen.

“Immediately;” Mark 1:14-20; January 25, 2015; FPC Holt

“Immediately”
Mark 1:14-20
January 25, 2015, First Presbyterian Church of Holt

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2015 1 25 Slide01Your pulse quickens, you feel your face flush; you are a force of kinetic energy spurred into motion. When is the last time in your life that you responded with great urgency? Was it jumping up for an awaited phone call? Running towards a stack of presents on Christmas morning?  Rushing out of the house following the news of an emergency situation with a loved one?

How’d you feel in that moment? What was it that compelled you forward?

2015 1 25 Slide06What if that phone call instead was someone asking you to do something that would genuinely inconvenience you? What if that gift was a trip with strangers to a foreign place? What if you were called instead to leave your loved ones, without reliable ways of checking in or letting them know how you are?

How would you react then? Would you be compelled with that same urgency? 2015 1 25 Slide08Or would you take a moment, pause and consider the ramifications of what you were being asked, given, and called to do?

I know I’d take some time to weigh the options, consider the situation fully, and take time to prayerfully respond. That’s the rational thing to do, right?

But this is not what we see in our Gospel today.

2015 1 25 Slide09In the first chapter of Mark, William Abraham writes, “Jesus sweeps through Galilee and takes it by storm….the underlying sense is that God is on the march in the ministry of Jesus”[1]. Jesus starts his recruitment with a proclamation, “the time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is near.” Or as Eugene Peterson translates it in The Message “Time’s up!”

2015 1 25 Slide10 But this wasn’t time in the way we usually encounter it, time marked by a clock or a calendar, this is the Greek word, kairos. Kairos is less about linear time and more about timeliness, something happening at the very moment it is meant to happen. Kairos is God’s timing, and in the beginning of our passage Jesus says that that time, that kairos has come, and there is no time to lose.

2015 1 25 Slide11 Immediately, Mark says. Immediately Simon and Andrew left their nets. Immediately James and John left their father. Immediately they were thrown into this new and uncertain role as Jesus’ disciples.

It sounds thrilling. It sounds terrifying. It also sounds freeing.

We’re not told what it was about Jesus that made that strange band of men join him. Jesus doesn’t give them an itinerary of their trip. He does provide a map or a guidebook. He doesn’t even give them packing instructions. All that we are told that he says to them is “follow me.”

2015 1 25 Slide12 In this time Rabbis were never the ones to seek out their students, rather they were approached by students, who were then interviewed and critiqued. This was not Jesus’ approach, he sought these men out and asked them to follow him. As disciples of Jesus they are called to learn and to be in a whole new way. And with so little information and so much uncertainty, this call from Jesus propels them outwards from all that they knew, towards uncertainty, and it happens immediately.

2015 1 25 Slide13Luther Seminary professor Karoline Lewis writes this of the disciple’s reaction to Jesus, “I think that ‘immediately’ can be less about marking time and more about describing action. Immediately does not only designate a when but a what. Not only a place in time, but an event that changes the meaning of life. Granted, the disciples have no clue at this point how life has been changed. But we know. And maybe immediately is all we can do, all we can manage. Because, preparation? Maybe it makes faith matters worse. Builds up anticipation, expectations. And then, when things do not go as planned? Maybe a life of faith can only happen in immediately, in the surprising, sudden, profound epiphany of God at work, God revealed in our lives. Because if we think we can adequately prepare for God’s epiphanies, that we can be fully ready for what we will see, well then, God might be less than epiphanous.”[2]

2015 1 25 Slide14Mark is a big fan of the word “immediately,” or ethous in the Greek to mean immediately, next, or suddenly. In fact Mark uses the word “ethous” no less than 40 times throughout his Gospel account. So much so that most translators, including those of our familiar New Revised Standard Version, seem to get a bit bored and switch things up using the words, “just then,” “at once,” “as soon as,” “quickly,” all getting at the heart of this incredibly sense of immediacy throughout Mark’s gospel.

The majority of those “immediately”s come up for us in Jesus’ miracles. As inclined as we are towards a reasoned weighing of options, this is not the way that Jesus operates. Jesus does not hold back, does not drag his feet, but responds immediately.

2015 1 25 Slide15Preacher Barbara Brown Taylor explains that this beachside story before us today is not the story of the disciples making a decision to follow allow with Jesus, but rather Jesus working a miracle among them. She writes “This is a story about the power of God – to walk right up to a quartet of fishermen and work a miracle, creating faith where there was no faith, creating disciples where there were none just a moment before…This is a story about God, and about God’s ability not only to call us but also to create us as a people who are able to follow – able to follow because we cannot take our eyes off the one who calls us, because he interests us more than anything else in our lives.”[3]

2015 1 25 Slide16In English, “immediately” refers to instantaneous timing, but it also refers to proximity. An immediate response to Jesus’ call to action enables us to be closer, more physically immediate to the way Jesus reveals God’s love for the world.

Who wouldn’t want a closer view to God’s action?

“Follow me.” It’s not just words on page, it’s a call for you and for me to expand God’s kingdom in this world through obedience to God’s call. “Follow me,” Jesus says. May we be transformed by our God who is eager to work through us and will do it, “immediately.” Amen.

[1] The Lectionary Commentary: The Gospels

[2] Karoline Lewis, “The Immediately of Epiphany” http://www.workingpreacher.org/craft.aspx?post=3500

[3] “Miracle on the Beach,” in “Home By Another Way,” by Barbara Brown Taylor