“Beloved” Matthew 3:13-17 January 12, 2014, FPC Jesup

“Beloved”
Matthew 3:13-17
January 12, 2014, First Presbyterian Church of Jesup

Slide01“And a voice from heaven said, ‘This is my Son, the Beloved, with whom I am well pleased.’” The Beloved. What a wonderful name to Jesus, for anyone, for all.

When I was in seminary my Hebrew professor, Carson Brisson, would always refer to one’s significant other as “beloved.” Occasionally Carson would ask friend of mine who was engaged and was in the class, “How is your beloved?”

To me, this title extends beyond what other titles can, because it names the action of being loved. It is an active title, a moving title. It whispers of all the many little actions that add up to being loved by another. It is holding hands and washing dishes and opening doors and holding one another close. It is carrying each other’s burdens and listening to each other’s concerns and sharing in each other’s joys. It is promise and covenant. Beloved.

Slide02I have a question for you, do you see yourself as beloved? Would you identify yourself in that way? If not, what are the words that you use to describe yourself? If you’ve been watching TV or seen any internet ads in this New Year, you’ll see many ways that this world will tell you you’re inadequate. Commercials will tell you that you need to lose weight, stop bad habits, read more, get ahead in your career, and in essence: change. All of these things can have a positive impact on our lives, but it’s also important to keep in mind that the One who created you loves you just as you are! The best resolution we can make is to allow ourselves to bask in the love of God and only once we are fully convinced that God loves us every step of the way can we go about improving our lives. We can glorify God through healthful living, God-honoring finances, and loving others as God loves us; all things that are done best when we acknowledge that we are worth it. We are beloved.

SLIDE 3 - Henri NouwenAuthor, professor, and Catholic priest Henri Nouwen once wrote, ““Over the years, I have come to realize that the greatest trap in our life is not success, popularity, or power, but self-rejection. Success, popularity, and power can indeed present a great temptation, but their seductive quality often comes from the way they are part of the much larger temptation to self-rejection. When we have come to believe in the voices that call us worthless and unlovable, then success, popularity, and power are easily perceived as attractive solutions. The real trap, however, is self-rejection. As soon as someone accuses me or criticizes me, as soon as I am rejected, left alone, or abandoned, I find myself thinking, “Well, that proves once again that I am a nobody.” … [My dark side says,] I am no good… I deserve to be pushed aside, forgotten, rejected, and abandoned. Self-rejection is the greatest enemy of the spiritual life because it contradicts the sacred voice that calls us the “Beloved.” Being the Beloved constitutes the core truth of our existence.”

Slide04One day in middle school I remember I was sitting in the cafeteria at lunch and one of my friends told me that she heard from someone else that a boy had a crush on me. Of course that was quite the convoluted expression of love, so I didn’t really know if I could trust it, but it was middle school after all so I thought, “really?” I remember looking around the cafeteria excitedly trying to figure out who it might be. Whose eyes were looking for mine, who was seeking me out, who cared for me in that way? I know I sat up a bit straighter, certainly twirled my hair a bit, and smiled. I don’t even think anything else became of that rumor, but even in the hope of that mysterious crush, my life was brightened. In being beloved, I was able to see myself in a better light.

If we can get so excited by the fleeting transient expressions of even middle school crushes, how infinitely more should our joy be in light of God our father calling us beloved.

What would it mean for you to take on the name beloved? To define yourself as one who is beloved by God? What would it mean to accept that God has chosen you as someone worthy of love?

In first John, the readers are addressed as, “beloved,” and told how we may love: “Beloved, let us love one another, because love is from God; everyone who loves is born of God and knows God. Whoever does not love does not know God, for God is love. God’s love was revealed among us in this way: God sent his only Son into the world so that we might live through him. In this is love, not that we loved God but that he loved us and sent his Son to be the atoning sacrifice for our sins.”

Slide061 John continues, “Beloved, since God loved us so much, we also ought to love one another. No one has ever seen God; if we love one another, God lives in us, and his love is perfected in us. By this we know that we abide in him and he in us, because he has given us of his Spirit. And we have seen and do testify that the Father has sent his Son as the Savior of the world.  God abides in those who confess that Jesus is the Son of God, and they abide in God. So we have known and believe the love that God has for us…. We love because he first loved us.”

Being beloved by God is to be invigorated by the greatest love we can ever imagine. It should lead us not only to sit up straight, but to stand in God’s light. It should lead us not to twirl our hair, but to extend our hands to care for others.  It should lead us to reflect the light of God’s love in the world. Because God loves us, we are able to love one another, we are able to speak God’s love into the world.

SLIDE 7 - Albert CamusAuthor and philosopher Albert Camus once wrote, “When you have once seen the glow of happiness on the face of a beloved person, you know that a man can have no vocation but to awaken that light on the faces surrounding him.”

What a great joy it is to share the news that each us of are the beloved of God. God actively loves each of us.

In Paul’s letter to the Thessalonians he writes, says, “For we know, brothers and sisters beloved by God, that he has chosen you, because our message of the gospel came to you not in word only, but also in power and in the Holy Spirit and with full conviction.”

Through God’s love we are anointed as disciples of God, transmitters of this great message of love. This passage tells us that the gospel message of Jesus’ great love for all of humanity was not a passive word, but a lived expression of love. Jesus lived a sinless life as an example for us of how to live: forgiving enemies, being in relationship with the outcast, and working so that all would know God’s love. Jesus died, experiencing the horror of hell, for us, so that we might be redeemed. This was God’s love in action. This was God being love and naming us the beloved.

Matthew 3:16 says, “And when Jesus had been baptized, just as he came up from the water, suddenly the heavens were opened to him and he saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove and alighting on him. And a voice from heaven said, ‘This is my Son, the Beloved, with whom I am well pleased.’”

Slide10In baptism we too are welcomed into the household of God, we become siblings with fellow Christians, and with the very Son of God, Jesus. In each baptism the words offered to Jesus are offered also to us from our heavenly Father, “You are my child, I love you, I am pleased with you. When we place our worth and identity in this knowledge we can’t help but be transformed.

SLIDE 11 - Brennan ManningFranciscan priest Brennan Manning wrote, “Living in awareness of our belovedness is the axis around which the Christian life revolves. Being the beloved is our identity, the core of our existence. It is not merely a lofty thought, an inspiring idea, or one name among many. It is the name by which God knows us and the way [God] relates to us.”[1]

“Beloved,” that was the name that was spoken at our own baptism, echoing over the millennia from Jesus’ own baptism. May your life be transformed through such a claim. Amen.

 


[1] Manning, Brennan Abba’s Child: the Cry of the Heart for Intimate Belonging. Expanded ed. Colorado Springs, CO: Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., 2002.

“Abundance;” Luke 12:13-34; August 4, 2013; FPC Jesup

“Abundance
Luke 12:13-34

August 4, 2013, First Presbyterian Church of Jesup

Slide01Where in your life do you feel inadequate? For many of us, when asked this question we can probably give a whole list of things: financial instability, health concerns, strained relationships, job insecurity, pain in the lives of those we love, heartache for the pain of the world. It seems like worry is somewhat of a default setting when we are thinking about our world.

Slide02My mind even brings up a scene from “Mean Girls,” in which a group of high school girls are looking at themselves in the mirror and each pointing out their own perceived physical deficiencies. When one of the girls doesn’t say anything negative about herself the other girls stare at her until she comes up with something, insisting through their peer pressure that there has to be something about who you are that is simply not good enough.

Slide03We seem trained to look for inadequacy, to point out our faults, to see where we are lacking. Worrying is such an easy thing to fall into, and when we’re doing it, it seems helpful, productive, supportive even. If we let it, this world will always make us feel that like the man in Jesus’ parable, that we need bigger barns; that what we have or who we are is not enough. The man in this story was not working from a place of true deficiency; in fact scripture tells us that the rich man had accumulated much wealth. But that wealth did not bring contentment, it simply brought about his perceived need for more barns for all of the crops he took in.

Slide04How about we ask another question: where in your life do you experience abundance? I hope we can also write a list for this one: plenty of food to eat, comfort of a roof over our heads, warmth of the company of loved ones, the joy of God’s creation, the love of our great God, and the companionship of a loving church family. I hope we can look into the mirror and share in God’s affirmation that God’s creation is indeed “good.”

SLIDE 5 - ContentmentAcknowledging the abundance in our lives isn’t as popular of a thing to think about. Counting our blessings can seem haughty. Acknowledging the depth of our inherent worth as children of God can seem unfounded since it is something we are unable to quantify. We are taught by this world that contentment is complacency. That being comfortable in our own skin, in our own pay scale, in our relationships, means that we don’t have enough ambition. Contentment, to some, seems like we are giving up on growth. God calls us to live deeply and fully into our lives, into our relationships, into the eternal.

1 Timothy 6:6-10, “Of course, there is great gain in godliness combined with contentment; for we brought nothing into the world, so that we can take nothing out of it; but if we have food and clothing, we will be content with these. But those who want to be rich fall into temptation and are trapped by many senseless and harmful desires that plunge people into ruin and destruction. For the love of money is a root of all kinds of evil, and in their eagerness to be rich some have wandered away from the faith and pierced themselves with many pains.” Accumulation of things that tie us to our earthly existence is an investment in that which simply will not last. Contentment is the acknowledgement of the blessings that are in our lives and finding joy in what already is.

Slide07There’s a British pop group named, “The Streets,” who have a song called “Everything is Borrowed” which echoes these verses. The music video for this song shows a family waking up in the morning to a knock on their door and the news that their house has been foreclosed. Everything in their home is now the possession of the bank. The video ends out with the couple and young son standing on the sidewalk in front of their house as everything they own is loaded into a moving truck to be taken by the bank’s collectors. As the camera pans out it’s hard to feel hopeful for this family who has just lost all that they own, but then the chorus to the song comes on. It goes like this: “I came to this world with nothing, and I leave with nothing but love. Everything else is just borrowed.”

While this telling of the family’s foreclosure is all too real of a reality in this economic time, our scripture speaks of a security beyond what we can carry around with us in this world, beyond what can be loaded into a moving truck or stored in barns.

Slide09Luke 12:33-34 says, “Make purses for yourselves that do not wear out, an unfailing treasure in heaven, where no thief comes near and no moth destroys. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.”

If we find our abundance in earthly things, we will be disappointed. If we invest in the stuff of this world, we will find that perhaps our barns are overflowing, but our lives are empty. Emphasis on the quantity in our lives life rather than on the quality will always be evasive.

Slide10This toxic desire for accumulation can even infect our church life. Even as we seek to welcome all who enter into this building with open arms, growing a church just to have more numbers on the rolls is not what we are called to be about. We are called first to grow in the depth of our love for one another, to show more richness towards God, and to fall more in love with the life to which God has called us. Abundance of love towards God and another opens the doors to the kingdom of God here on earth.

Slide11One deficiency that this passage points out as being very, very real, is the fleeting nature of time. While the man in the parable had accumulated wealth so he could live comfortably, in verse 20 we are told that he will lose his life that very night. And in Luke 12:25 we read, “And can any of you by worrying add a single hour to your span of life?”

While all in this congregation will find themselves with different timelines trailing behind them, none of us can know what time lies before us. When we are working with such unknowably finite time, busyness becomes an idol. We want to have some thing to show for our time, some quantifiable measure of our worth.

SLIDE 12 - BusyAuthor, Carrie Anne Hudson writes, “Busyness is an interesting god.  It tells us that we are important and needed.  It reminds us that if we keep moving, eventually our existence will be validated.  This idol tells us that if we stop to chat with our elderly neighbor or write a letter to a friend, that someone else will be gaining ground on us.  Busyness becomes such powerful force demanding our worship, that we minimize things like relationships because relating doesn’t get us anywhere.”

Slide13Belief that self-worth is based on time devoted to productivity or solely reflected by paychecks is a lie. I’ve seen friends that struggle with this when making decisions on whether or not to be a stay at home parent. When so much of our life path is structured towards being “productive members of society,” we are not conditioned to see the worth of relationship and the blessing of time invested in the well being of others.

Slide14When reading the parable of the foolish man, it’s important to realize why this man is foolish and how this man is making his decisions. In verse 17 it says, “he thought to himself,” and in verse 19, “and I will say to my soul.” This man was talking to himself!

Slide15In his abundance of crops, he wasn’t taking any time to think about how his abundance could contribute to the lives of those around him. Nor was he taking time to be thankful for the others who had allowed this abundance to be possible. Surely he had help working the fields and surely he could be thankful for appropriate weather conditions that allowed for such a harvest. Wealth in and of itself is not the sin presented in this story or what makes him foolish; it’s the man’s inability to consider others when managing his wealth. It is his investment in his own material happiness, at the expense of others. There are people around him who could benefit from his material abundance, and also from his eternal investment of relationship.

In verse 19 and following we read that the rich man says to his soul, “’Soul, you have ample goods laid up for many years; relax, eat, drink, be merry.’ But God said to him, ‘You fool! This very night your life is being demanded of you. And the things you have prepared, whose will they be?’ So it is with those who store up treasures for themselves but are not rich toward God.”

Slide17What does it mean to be “rich towards God?” Richness in God is acting in ways that enlarge God’s kingdom, welcoming others into the abundant life to which God is calling them. Matthew 25:31-46 tells us how we may to be rich towards God, how we may invest in our eternal inheritance:

“When the Son of Man comes in his glory, and all the angels with him, then he will sit on the throne of his glory. All the nations will be gathered before him, and he will separate people one from another as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats, and he will put the sheep at his right hand and the goats at the left. Then the king will say to those at his right hand, ‘Come, you that are blessed by my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world; for I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me, I was naked and you gave me clothing, I was sick and you took care of me, I was in prison and you visited me.’

Slide18Then the righteous will answer him, ‘Lord, when was it that we saw you hungry and gave you food, or thirsty and gave you something to drink? And when was it that we saw you a stranger and welcomed you, or naked and gave you clothing? And when was it that we saw you sick or in prison and visited you?’  And the king will answer them, ‘Truly I tell you, just as you did it to one of the least of these who are members of my family, you did it to me.’ Then he will say to those at his left hand, ‘You that are accursed, depart from me into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels; for I was hungry and you gave me no food, I was thirsty and you gave me nothing to drink, I was a stranger and you did not welcome me, naked and you did not give me clothing, sick and in prison and you did not visit me.’ Then they also will answer, ‘Lord, when was it that we saw you hungry or thirsty or a stranger or naked or sick or in prison, and did not take care of you?’ Then he will answer them, ‘Truly I tell you, just as you did not do it to one of the least of these, you did not do it to me.’ And these will go away into eternal punishment, but the righteous into eternal life.”

Slide19We become rich towards God when we are rich towards one another. The prepositions are important here. Being rich towards God is very different from being rich from God. Richness towards God is applying the abundances of our lives in ways that work to bringing about God’s kingdom. It is not simply sitting back storing up the blessings we have received, placing them in our barns and closing the doors. Richness towards God is investing the material wealth, and particularly the meager wealth of time we have, in relationships that bring God glory.

In Luke 12:29-31 we read, “And do not keep striving for what you are to eat and what you are to drink, and do not keep worrying. For it is the nations of the world that strive after all these things, and your Father knows that you need them. Instead, strive for his kingdom, and these things will be given to you as well.”

Striving for the kingdom, rather than the world, is a radical proposition. This means giving up the twin vices of worry and busyness. It means counting our blessings. It means seeing our abundance as not something to be squandered, but something to be shared.

Slide21As “The Streets” remind us, “We came to this world with nothing, and we leave with nothing but love. Everything else is just borrowed.” May we invest our love richly in ways that last. Amen.

 

 

Here is “Everything is Borrowed,” by “The Streets”:

“Three-In-One,” Romans 5:1-5 and John 16:12-15; May 26, 2013, FPC Jesup

“Three-In-One”
Romans 5:1-5 and John 16:12-15
May 26, 2013, First Presbyterian Church of Jesup

Slide01Have you ever been watching television in the middle of the day and you see one of those infomercials? You know the ones, ones that offer a product that will change your cooking/cleaning/daily life/outlook/world in such a profound way that you’ve just got to have it! And it comes to you cheap and you’ll get a second one if you call right now!

SLIDE 3 - As Seen on TVThough I’ll admit I do have a few “as seen on tv,” products in my life, I’ve always been a bit dubious about the claims that are made for these products. Will it really do all of those things at the same time? Will it really be of a good quality at that price? Why do I suddenly feel like my life won’t be the same without it? Those ads can be quite effective if you’re in the right mood!

SLIDE 4 - TrinityWell this morning I’m going to tell you about another multifunctioning, got to have it, sort of thing: the three in one of our faith, the trinity.

The trinity is one of those often referred to but rarely understood beliefs of the church. Like infomercial sales people we may take on the overeager, seemingly unfounded certainty and proclaim: Creator, redeemer, sustainer! Father, Son, Holy Ghost!

Slide05But then we sit back in the pews like we do on our living room sofas and ask: really? Can God be all of those things at the same time? Does God’s energy get divided? How is my life different for claiming God is three in one? How much am I going to have to pay for shipping and handling for this one?!

SLIDE 6 - TrinityActually, there’s no shipping and handling, and there’s no need for multiple payments, but it does beckon us to watch what’s next, as in the unpacking of these statements we are able to grow closer to God.

The trinity is often described as the different roles of God. One God with multiple roles, points to a quite practical idea that unity and is achieved through interrelationship.

SLIDE 7 - About a BoyA favorite movie of mine, “About a Boy,” starts with the main character, Will, claiming that Bon Jovi got it wrong and “All men are islands… This is an island age. A hundred years ago, for example, you had to depend on other people. No one had TV or CDs or DVDs or home espresso makers… now you can make yourself a little island paradise.”

Through these couch side purchases and a small fortune off of royalties for a one hit wonder his dad wrote Will does manage to live quite isolated, quite self-centered. But when he reaches outside of his own little corner of the world his life gets much more complicated and much more fulfilling through relationships.  At the end of the movie his view changes and Will restates his theory, SLIDE 8 - Island Chains “Every man is an island. I stand by that. But clearly some men are island CHAINS. Underneath, they are connected.” In the course of the movie Will becomes a friend, mentor, and boyfriend, and is made much more whole through these relationships.

SLIDE 9 – JugglingWe are who we are in context of relationship, like how I am simultaneously a pastor, daughter, and friend. As humans when we try to fully support each role we occupy we can become overwhelmed and feel inadequate. I know I often feel pulled in multiple directions in the different roles I try and live into. This is not the same with God. God is actually able to be all things at the same time.

Anglican pastor Richard Norris explains the Trinity as the way we interact with God through the different roles we are to God and God is to us. He writes that this relationship “is, first of all, a relation of creature to Creator. At the same time, it is a relation of sinner to Redeemer. Finally, it is the relation of one in process of transformation to the Power, which transforms. This is the threefold way in which Christian faith knows and receives the God of the exodus and the resurrection.”[1]

Senkaku isles in JapanKnowing God as creator, redeemer, and transformer expands our island chain of connection with God. By relating to God in these different ways we are better able to see below the surface of connection into the depth of relationship.

Oxygen Volume 14It means something different to me to know that God created me. When I acknowledge God as creator I have to also acknowledge being created in God’s own image. This forces me into the sometimes uncomfortable knowledge that how I look is exactly what God intended. That God is revealed through who I am, how I am, what I am. This is simultaneously daunting and empowering. This person in front of you, and all of these people gathered here are a reflection of the “good” ness God proclaimed at creation. You are good. You are in God’s image. Understanding God as creator is also knowing God as all knowing, all encompassing. Psalm 34:18 refers to God as close to the brokenhearted. This is God the parent who weeps with us, loves us in our brokenness and in the sorrow of our human experience.

Slide13It means something different to me to know that God is my redeemer through Jesus Christ. Jesus came to this earth, lived, breathed, and walked about on this planet. God doesn’t just stay far off, but comes near, comes into the human story, into human history. I can’t imagine it would be the most comfortable thing to be both God and human. I wonder if human skin felt itchy to Jesus? God as redeemer also makes me think about all of the horribleness that Jesus endured both on the cross and through experiencing hell on our behalf. God as redeemer reminds me of my sin, it reminds me of my need for redemption. It makes me feel a bit itchy in my own skin, in my own sinfulness. It reminds me that there is life beyond our human walking-around experience.

Slide14It means something different to me to know that God transforms me through the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit, sometimes called the “Holy Ghost,” can seem a bit spooky, a bit illusive. I picture God as Holy Spirit as an invisible blanket covering all of us, the impermeable atmosphere of the heavens touching earth. I think of God as Holy Spirit as that voice whispering in the stillness on that mountaintop to Elijah. I think of that bush set on fire in the beyond the wilderness place where Moses was hiding out with sheep. I think of my own places of searching, of loneliness and God whispering into my ear messages of hope, of love, of connection, of joy. Knowing God through the Holy Spirit is knowing God who is speaking to you, to your life, to your mountaintop, to your valley. It know God as Holy Spirit is to trust that God is still speaking.

SLIDE 15 - TrinityKnowing God in these three ways can and should change us. Like discovering those island chain connections knowing God better, having better spiritual geography, reminds us who we are and whose was are.

Presbyterian pastor and theologian, Frederick Buechner explains the trinity in this way: “If the idea of God as both Three and One seems farfetched… look in the mirror someday. There is (a) the interior life known only to yourself and those you choose to communicate it to [which is like God,] the Father. There is (b) the visible face, which in some measure reflects that inner life [which is like God,] the Son. And there is (c) the invisible power you have which enables you to communicate that interior life in such a way that others do not merely known about it, but know it in the sense of its becoming part of who they are [which is like God,] the Holy Spirit. Yet what you are looking at in the mirror is clearly and indivisibly the one and only you.” [2]

The different aspects of God reveal God’s depth and reveal our own complexity as created beings.

In our epistle reading today Paul explains the different natures of God in how they interact with each other in regards to grace: “1Therefore, since we are justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ, 2through whom we have obtained access to this grace in which we stand; and we boast in our hope of sharing the glory of God… God’s love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit that has been given to us.”[3]

 So, we become justified with God through Jesus Christ. Jesus is the redeemer, the aspect of God that bent to this earth to pave our own way to heaven, cover our sins so that we may fully be in relationship with God. The redeemer brings us peace. Jesus the redeemer gives us a way to access grace.

By this grace we can share in God, the creator’s glory. This glory is the great goodness of the whole wide world. This glory is the building of a Kingdom both on earth and in heaven. Sharing in the creator’s glory means taking on the joy and responsibility of being God’s children.

The Holy Spirit is the aspect of God that places Gods love in our hearts, or as the text poetically says, “pours.”

These three aspects of God work together, going about being God by relating to us in specific ways: indivisible yet multifunctional.

Perhaps a bit like those products the infomercials tell us about. Three-in-one. One-in-three. All available if you call right now!

Slide24Confused? Still sitting on that couch with the remote in your hand deciding whether or not you actually buy these claims? Our gospel reading today speaks of the Holy Spirit’s impending clarity, saying, “I still have many things to say to you, but you cannot bear them now. When the Spirit of truth comes, he will guide you into all the truth.”[4]

Notice that it does not say if the Spirit of truth comes. It says when. God does not leave us in our confusion but desires to speak truth into our lives, when we can handle it. As a professional theological thinker you better believe I’m looking forward to a time devoid of theological confusion. SLIDE 26 - TrinityBut in the meantime, I’m sort of loving thinking about the many and varied ways that God is God unto Godself, and that God is God to me. May we yearn to know God better. May we not forget that we are created, we are redeemed, we are transformed. Amen!


[1] Richard Norris, “Understanding the Faith of the Church”

[2] Frederick Buechner, Wishful Thinking: a Seeker’s Abc, Rev. and expanded [ed.]. ed. (San Francisco: HarperOne, 1993), p. 9.

[3] Romans 5:1-2, 5a

[4] John 16:12-13